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honoriartist


honoria in ciberspazio

gallery + reflections


Fiction featuring artists
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honoriartist

Dominic Smith's recommendations of fiction books with artists as main characters.

https://electricliterature.com/the-great-fictional-artists-of-literature-a-reading-list/


Picasso Eyes Zen Chicken
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honoriartist
12 x 16 inch drawing in black ink on white cold pressed plein air watercolor board
12 x 16 inch drawing in black ink on white cold pressed plein air watercolor board
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Saatchi Zen Chicken Sea Horse
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honoriartist
Ink drawing with rubber stamps.  Acrylic ink and archival stamp ink on 12 x 16" art board.
Ink drawing with rubber stamps. Acrylic ink and archival stamp ink on 12 x 16" art board.

The antelope brown ink diffuses into a warm gold when water is added. In this Zen Chicken with the Sea Horse Head the swirling curls repeat to create a rhythm of nature and art as the elements blend into a unique dynamic balance. The calligraphic strokes of the brown to gold ink contrast with the rubber stamped sea horse and decorative dots to create a conversation starter.  

The why of my Zen chicken flock is art history.  I am inspired by collage, asemic writing, cave art, and Dada.  In my creative process unexpected, unexplained contrasts are positioned as harmonies. 

The drawing measures 12 x 16 inch archival rubber stamp ink and acryl-gouache drawing on watercolor board .  Canson Plein Air Watercolor Artboards are rigid, acid-free, 2 ply (1.5 mm) boards that have been laminated to 129 lb (190 gsm) cold press Canson paper. The drawing is signed by the artist with a vermilion and white signature chop on the front, and with full name and date on the back. Ships mounted in an archival mat ready to pop into a 16 x 20 inch frame style of your choice.

Visit me at https://www.saatchiart.com/honoriastarbuck



Zen Chickens for Saatchi
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honoriartist
Cloudy Pastels Zen Chicken painting in gouache and ink. 12 x 16 inches on 140 lb watercolor paper.
Cloudy Pastels Zen Chicken painting in gouache and ink. 12 x 16 inches on 140 lb watercolor paper.


Surprised and befuddled, this is a black young rooster wakes up to a world full of colored eggs reflected in his plumage. Easter-egg hunt inspired Zen Chicken incorporates pastels in greyed out tones of matte gouache.

Zen Chicken drawings reflect my joy in gesturing ink onto paper and are a continuation of my 13 year practice of tai chi and 50 year practice of drawing. 

12 x 16 inch original ink and acryl-gouache painting on 140 lb. watercolor paper.
Signed by the artist with front signature chop and with full name and date on the back. Ships mounted in archival mat ready to pop into a 16 x 20 inch frame style of your choice.



Katherina Grosse
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honoriartist
Katherina Grosse in front of one of her sprayed paintings
Katherina Grosse in front of one of her sprayed paintings
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Cryptocurrency and Art
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honoriartist

Distributed Gallery had no connection with the American artist (Richard Prince). This virtual dealership and its “Ready Made Token” are instead a playful experiment devised by Olivier Sarrouy, a philosophy and sociology lecturer at the University Rennes 2 in France, along with three friends.


The appropriation of this name was certainly mischievous, given that the “famous” Richard Prince continues to be involved in a lawsuit concerning his appropriation of an Instagram-sourced photograph for a 2014 exhibition. Adding further confusion, Mr. Prince’s most recent show of paintings at the Gladstone Gallery was titled “Ripple,” which also happens to the name of a high-rising cryptocurrency.


“We were trying to explore how a cryptocurrency could relate to scarcity in the art market,” Mr. Sarrouy, 32, said in a telephone interview. “It reinterpreted Marcel Duchamp’s gesture of the ready-made in a radical way.”


Reyburn, Scott. "Will Cryptocurrencies Be the Art Market’s Next Big Thing?" New York Times. Last modified January 13, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/13/arts/cryptocurrency-art-market.html



Discussion of cryptocurrencies in art panels at art fairs.

At Art Basel Miami, security token debate rages on ‘There is no AML/KYC in art’ By Martine Paris, December 20, 2018


April Fools
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honoriartist

Satire

After a Lifetime of Rejecting Technology, Artist Tino Sehgal Falls in Love with Instagram

Tino Segal, famous for his “objectless” performances that are never to be photographed, is now on Instagram.

Dorian Batycka  April 1, 2019


Not April Fools

Cycling Through Tino Sehgal’s “Constructed Situations” in Marrakesh

Dorian Batycka  June 7, 2016

https://hyperallergic.com/303704/cycling-through-tino-sehgals-constructed-situations-in-marrakesh/


Richard Shiff - Writing about Contemporary Art course
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honoriartist

I begin with a distinction drawn by the art historian and theorist Richard Shiff in an essay called 'Figuration' between three interpretative attitudes that correspond to the figures of the artist, the critic and the historian, and so to the practices of art, criticism and history: art is the mode of belief, commitment and overt expressiveness; criticism (which includes theory) is the mode of doubt and irony; history is the mode of observation and dispassionate judgment. (Shiff, 1996: 325) Shiff thought that each of these attitudes were not found separately in the figures of the artist, critic or historian, but rather that all three were present in each figure, the character of which was only determined according to an emphasis on one or the other.  Furthermore, these attitudes did not necessarily correspond to actually existing artists, critics or historians.  Depending on intellectual history and conventions, the attitude of an historian, for example, could be predominantly 'artistic', if this historian wrote expressively or explicitly from their own point of view.  Similarly, the attitude of an artist could be predominantly 'critical', if this artist's work functioned in the mode of irony, revealing the conventional character of artistic expressionism, for example.   Shiff's artist-critic-historian schema provides a useful way in for thinking through the possible interpretative attitudes that might arise when an artist is asked to produce a theoretical commentary on their own work. 

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Relational Aesthetics
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honoriartist

The French curator Nicholas Bourriaud published a book called Relational Aesthetics in 1998 in which he defined the term as:

A set of artistic practices which take as their theoretical and practical point of departure the whole of human relations and their social context, rather than an independent and private space

He saw artists as facilitators rather than makers and regarded art as information exchanged between the artist and the viewers. The artist, in this sense, gives audiences access to power and the means to change the world.

Bourriaud cited the art of Gillian Wearing, Philippe Parreno, Douglas Gordon and Liam Gillick as artists who work to this agenda.

Guggenheim show: https://hyperallergic.com/18426/wtf-is-relational-aesthetics/

"When someone with an MFA wants to meet new people" Hennessy Youngman

Hennessy Youngman Published on Mar 15, 2011   WHAT UP INTERNET. THIS YA BOY HENNESSY YOUNGMAN, AND TODAY I WANTED TO MOVE BACK INTO THEORY A LITTLE BIT AND INTRODUCE AND EXPLAIN THIS THING CALLED RELATIONAL AESTHETICS TO YA'LL. U KNOW I LOVE YOU INTERNET

https://www.tate.org.uk/research/publications/tate-papers/02/awkward-relations

While relational aesthetics continued dialogue with critical theory and the history of ‘socially engaged’ art practices as a means of rearticulating art’s role in the world, many artists and curators have busily proceeded in another equally historicised direction. Creating ‘feel good’ exhibitions designed to re-affirm the status of art and modernist myths of ‘intuitive’ working practices, the alleged ‘return’ of object making (did this ever stop?) seemed to go hand in hand with a time of increasing geopolitical instability and economic expansion. There are, however, other ideological reasons for the rise of what has been touted as a ‘new formalism’. The relationalism that proliferated at the turn of the early twenty-first century placed undue emphasis art as a technologically determined form of communication, tending to rule out the possibility that art might be made using ‘regressive’ techniques or that it might fail to signify.4 There are three main problems with this technist, causal view of art. Firstly, it assumes that we can determine our judgements of artistic intention on the evidence of objects alone when material effects and acts have no essential meaning other than those that we bring to them. Secondly, it allows little room for failure, or for the possibility that the most interesting things in art praxis emerge from mistakes.5 Indeed, artists working in Scotland and London have lately placed a great deal of emphasis on working practice, an emphasis that simply is not compatible with the idea of ‘professional practice’. Thirdly, there is the danger that the over emphasis on post-production and consumption-based culture will eradicate all trace of place and origin, of labour and of the social relations involved in production.  — Neil Mulholland




Chickenoid Poster
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honoriartist
Adobe template for poster - test
Adobe template for poster - test

Visit my website. See my chickenoids. Daily ink drawings.