October 3rd, 2002

pinhole camera

NYC Ray show and Vittore research news

I talked to Lance Kinz director of the Feigen Gallery where there is a Ray Johnson show that's tied to the opening of the How to Draw a Bunny film in NYC. I wish I could drop into the gallery, see the collages and see the film. Lance is going to send me a price list and may connect me to the estate archivist to do a post-doc article on the Philip Guston Bat Tub project. I wrote my 15 minutes today and typed the final clustering ideas in the file.

Here is some news from Vittore Baroni about other research going on:
...this seems to be more and more the right time for documenting the existence and history of mail art and other fringe art movements, like visual poetry or copy art. During the Summer I received some very interesting publications, like Renaud Siegmann’s Mail Art (Editions Alternatives, Paris, 2002), a coffee table book richly illustrated in colour with a somewhat original and fresh view of postal art, though not always historically accurate; Writing To Be Seen (Light and Dust, USA, 2001) is a great collective anthology of essays and portfolios of American visual poetry and textual art, edited by Bob Grumman and Crag Hill; the mammouth volume Interarchive (Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther K?, K? 2002) produced by a workshop at the Kunstraum der Universit?g and documenting "archival practices and sites in the contemporary art field", includes views and descriptions of a few mail art archives, among which the E.O.N. Archive by yours truly; Geza Perneczky from Germany was ultra-kind and mailed me a big package with the unedited manuscripts (1 of 6 self-published laser copies) of his new networking researches, the 572 pages of the Network Atlas ("a historical atlas for the post-fluxus movements, as mail art, visual poetry, copy art, stamp art & other relative trends with addresses, projects, publications & exhibition events") and the first tome of the commented and illustrated list of materials in Geza’s own Soft Geometry Archives I ("correspondence works & labels"), a gigantic effort that I really hope Perneczky will be able to complete soon and release in print; Honoria in Texas is working on her University dissertation about "artists and the Internet" that, from a few sample excerpts that she has sent me via e-mail, looks like another research work of some interest to mail artists. Maybe mail art as a networking practice is shrinking, but scholarly work on its 40+ years history and legacy is just budding. To these books and works in progress, add a numerically small but still healthy dose of self-produced mail art magazines, testifying the direct personal bond and interaction between networkers: just like Gianni Simone’s Kairan (3-3-23 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama-shi, 226-0027 Kanagawa-ken, Japan) with its fifth issue dedicated to the memory of Robin Crozier (it is time to weep again, from Karla Sachse I got recently the sad news of the untimely passing of postcard maestro Joseph W. Huber) and #6 fresh out of the xerox machine, or the first issue of the brand new corresponDances produced by Tartarugo (Apartado 822, 36280 Vigo, Spain).
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